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Danielson Rubric

 

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content & Pedagogy

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Knowledge of content and the structure of the discipline

 

In planning and practice, teacher makes content errors or does not correct errors made by students.

 

Teacher is familiar with the important concepts in the discipline but may display lack of awareness of how these concepts relate to one another.

Teacher displays solid knowledge of the important concepts in the discipline and how these relate to one another.

 

Teacher displays extensive knowledge of the important concepts in the discipline and how these relate both to oneanother and to other disciplines.

Knowledge of prerequisite
relationships

 

Teacher’s plans and practice display little understanding of prerequisite relationships important to student learning of the content.

 

Teacher’s plans and practice indicate some awareness of prerequisite relationships, although such knowledge may be inaccurate or incomplete.

 

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect accurate understanding of prerequisite relationships among topics and concepts.

 

Teacher’s plans and practices reflect understanding of prerequisite relationships among topics and concepts and a link to necessary cognitive structures by students to ensure understanding.

Knowledge of content-related pedagogy

 

Teacher displays little or no understanding of the range of pedagogical approaches suitable to student learning of the content.

 

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect a limited range of pedagogical approaches or some approaches that are not suitable to the discipline or to the students.

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect familiarity with a wide range of effective pedagogical approaches in the discipline.

 

Teacher’s plans and practice reflect familiarity with a wide range of effective pedagogical approaches in the discipline, anticipating student misconceptions.

 


 

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Knowledge of child and adolescent development

 

Teacher displays little or no knowledge of the developmental characteristics of the age group.

 

Teacher displays partial knowledge of the developmental characteristics of the age group.

 

Teacher displays accurate understanding of the typical developmental characteristics of the age group, as well as exceptions to the general patterns.

 

In addition to accurate knowledge of the typical developmental characteristics of the age group and exceptions to the general patterns, teacher displays knowledge of the extent to which individual students follow the general patterns.

Knowledge of the
learning process

 

Teacher sees no value in understanding how students learn and does not seek such information.

 

Teacher recognizes the value of knowing how students learn, but this knowledge is limited or outdated.

 

Teacher’s knowledge of how students learn is accurate and current. Teacher applies this knowledge to the class as a whole and to groups of students.

Teacher displays extensive and subtle understanding of how students learn and applies this knowledge to individual students.

 

Knowledge of students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency

 

Teacher displays little or no knowledge of students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency and does not indicate that such knowledge is valuable.

 

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency but displays this knowledge only for the class as a whole.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency and displays this knowledge for groups of ­students.

 

Teacher displays understanding of individual students’ skills, knowledge, and language proficiency and has a strategy for maintaining such information.

Knowledge of students’ interests and cultural heritage

 

Teacher displays little or no knowledge of students’ interests or cultural heritage and does not indicate that such knowledge is valuable.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ interests and cultural heritage but displays this knowledge only for the class as a whole.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ interests and cultural heritage and displays this knowledge for groups of students.

Teacher recognizes the value of understanding students’ interests and cultural heritage and displays this knowledge for individual students.

Knowledge of students’ special needs

 

Teacher displays little or no understanding of students’ special learning or medical needs or why such knowledge is important.

 

Teacher displays awareness of the importance of knowing students’ special learning or medical needs, but such knowledge may be incomplete or inaccurate.

Teacher is aware of students’ special learning and medical needs.

 

Teacher possesses information about each student’s learning and medical needs, collecting such information from a variety of sources.

 

 

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Value, sequence,
and alignment

 

Outcomes represent low expectations for students and lack of rigor. They do not reflect important learning in the discipline or a connection to a sequence of learning.

 

Outcomes represent moderately high expectations and rigor. Some reflect important learning in the discipline and at least some connection to a sequence of learning.

 

Most outcomes represent high expectations and rigor and important learning in the discipline. They are connected to a sequence of learning.

 

All outcomes represent high expectations and rigor and important learning in the discipline. They are connected to a sequence of learning both in the discipline and in related disciplines.

 

Clarity

 

Outcomes are either not clear or are stated as activities, not as student learning. Outcomes do not permit viable methods of assessment.

 

Outcomes are only moderately clear or consist of a combination of outcomes and activities. Some outcomes do not permit viable methods of assessment.

All the instructional outcomes are clear, written in the form of student learning. Most suggest viable methods of assessment.

 

All the outcomes are clear, written in the form of student learning, and permit viable methods of assessment.

 

Balance

 

Outcomes reflect only one type of learning and only one discipline or strand.

 

Outcomes reflect several types of learning, but teacher has made no attempt at coordination or integration.

 

Outcomes reflect several ­different types of learning andopportunities for coordination.

 

Where appropriate, outcomes reflect several different types of learning and opportunities for both coordination and integration.

Suitability for diverse learners

 

Outcomes are not suitable for the class or are not based on any assessment of student needs.

 

Most of the outcomes are suitable for most of the students in the class based on global assessments of student learning.

 

Most of the outcomes are suitable for all students in the class and are based on evidence of student proficiency. However, the needs of some individual students may not be accommodated.

Outcomes are based on a comprehensive assessment of student learning and take into account the varying needs of individual students or groups.

 

 


 

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Resources for classroom use

 

Teacher is unaware of resources for classroom use available through the school or district.

 

Teacher displays awareness of resources available for classroom use through the school or district but no knowledge of resources available more broadly.

 

Teacher displays awareness of resources available for classroom use through the school or district and some familiarity with resources external tothe school and on the Internet.

Teacher’s knowledge of resources for classroom use is extensive, including those available through the school or district, in the community, through professional organizations and universities, and on the Internet.

Resources to extend content knowledge and pedagogy

 

Teacher is unaware of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge available through the school or district.

 

Teacher displays awareness of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge available through the school or district but no knowledge of resources available more broadly.

 

Teacher displays awareness of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge available through the school or district and some familiarity with resources external tothe school and on the Internet.

Teacher’s knowledge of resources to enhance content and pedagogical knowledge is extensive, including those available through the school or district, in the community, through professional organizations and universities, and on the Internet.

Resources for students

 

Teacher is unaware of resources for students available through the school or district.

 

Teacher displays awareness of resources for students available through the school or district but no knowledge of resources available more broadly.

 

Teacher displays awareness of resources for students available through the school or district and some familiarity with resources external to the school and on the Internet.

Teacher’s knowledge of resources for students is extensive, including those available through the school or district, in the community, and on the Internet.

 

 


 

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Learning activities

 

Learning activities are not suitable to students or to instructional outcomes and are not designed to engage students in active intellectual activity.

 

Only some of the learning activities are suitable to students or to the instructional outcomes. Some represent a moderate cognitive challenge, but with no differentiation for different students.

 

All of the learning activities are suitable to students or to the instructional outcomes, and most represent significant cognitive challenge, with some differentiation for different groups of students.

 

Learning activities are highly suitable to diverse learners and support the instructional outcomes. They are all designed to engage students in high-level cognitive activity and are differentiated, as appropriate, for individual learners.

Instructional materials and resources

 

Materials and resources are not suitable for students and do not support the instructional outcomes or engage students in meaningful learning.

 

Some of the materials and resources are suitable to students, support the instructional outcomes, and engage students in meaningful learning.

 

All of the materials and resources are suitable to students, support the instructional outcomes, and are designed to engage students in meaningful learning.

 

All of the materials and resources are suitable to students, support the instructional outcomes, and are designed to engage students in meaningful learning. There is evidence of appropriate use of technology and of student participation in selecting or adapting materials.

Instructional groups

 

Instructional groups do not support the instructional outcomes and offer no variety.

 

Instructional groups partially support the instructional outcomes, with an effort at providing some variety.

 

Instructional groups are varied as appropriate to the students and the different instructional outcomes.

 

Instructional groups are varied as appropriate to the students and the different instructional outcomes. There is evidence of student choice in selecting the different patterns of instructional groups.

Lesson and unit
structure

 

The lesson or unit has no clearly defined structure, or the structure is chaotic. Activities do not follow an organized progression, and time allocations are unrealistic.

The lesson or unit has a recognizable structure, although the structure is not uniformly maintained throughout. Progression of activities is uneven, with most time allocations reasonable.

The lesson or unit has a clearly defined structure around which activities are organized. Progression of activities is even, with reasonable time allocations.

The lesson’s or unit’s structure is clear and allows for different pathways according to diverse student needs. The progression of activities is highly coherent.

 


 

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1f: Designing Student Assessments

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Congruence with instructional outcomes

 

Assessment procedures are not congruent with instructional outcomes.

 

Some of the instructional outcomes are assessed through the proposed approach, but many are not.

 

All the instructional outcomes are assessed through the approach to assessment; assessment methodologies may have been adapted for groups of students.

 

Proposed approach to assessment is fully aligned with the instructional outcomes in both content and process. Assessment methodologies have been adapted for individual students, as needed.

Criteria and standards

 

Proposed approach contains no criteria or standards.

 

Assessment criteria and standards have been developed, but they are not clear.

Assessment criteria and standards are clear.

 

Assessment criteria and standards
are clear; there is evidence that the students contributed to their development.

Design of formative assessments

 

Teacher has no plan to incorporate formative assessment in the lesson or unit.

 

Approach to the use of formative assessment is rudimentary, including only some of the instructional outcomes.

Teacher has a well-developed strategy to using formative assessment and has designed particular approaches to be used.

Approach to using formative assessment is well designed and includes student as well as teacher use of the assessment information.

Use for planning

 

Teacher has no plans to use assessment results in designing future instruction.

Teacher plans to use assessment results to plan for future instruction for the class as a whole.

Teacher plans to use assessment results to plan for future instruction for groups of ­students.

Teacher plans to use assessment results to plan future instruction for individual students.

 


 

Domain 2: The classroom environment

Component 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Teacher interaction with students

 

Teacher interaction with at least some students is negative, demeaning, sarcastic, or inappropriate to the age or culture of the students. Students exhibit disrespect for the teacher.

 

Teacher-student interactions are generally appropriate but may reflect occasional inconsistencies, favoritism, or disregard for students’ cultures. Students exhibit only minimal respect for the teacher.

Teacher-student interactions are friendly and demonstrate general caring and respect. Such interactions are appropriate to the age and cultures of the students. Students exhibit respect for the teacher.

Teacher interactions with students reflect genuine respect and caring for individuals as well as groups of students. Students appear to trust the teacher with sensitive information.

 

Student interactions with other students

 

Student interactions are characterized by conflict, sarcasm, or put-downs.

 

Students do not demonstrate disrespect for one another.

 

Student interactions are generally polite and respectful.

 

Students demonstrate genuine caring for one another and monitor one another’s treatment of peers, correcting classmates respectfully when needed.

 


 

Domain 2: The classroom environment

Component 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Importance of the content

 

Teacher or students convey a negative attitude toward the content, suggesting that it is not important or has been mandated by others.

Teacher communicates importance of the work but with little conviction and only minimal apparent buy-in by the students.

Teacher conveys genuine enthusiasm for the content, and students demonstrate consistent commitment to
its value.

Students demonstrate through their active participation, curiosity, and taking initiative that they value the importance of the content.

Expectations for learning and achievement

 

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey low expectations for at least some students.

 

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey only modest expectations for student learning and achievement.

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey high expectations for most students.

 

Instructional outcomes, activities and assignments, and classroom interactions convey high expectations for all students. Students appear to have internalized these expectations.

Student pride in work

 

Students demonstrate little or no pride in their work. They seem to be motivated by the desire to complete a task rather than to do high-quality work.

Students minimally accept the responsibility to do good work but invest little of their energy into its quality.

 

Students accept the teacher’s insistence on work of high quality and demonstrate pride in that work.

 

Students demonstrate attention to detail and take obvious pride in their work, initiating improvements in it by, for example, revising drafts on their own or helping peers.

 


 

Domain 2: The classroom environment

Component 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Management
of instructional groups

 

Students not working with the teacher are not productively engaged in learning.

Students in only some groups are productively engaged in learning while unsupervised by the teacher.

 

Small-group work is well organized, and most students are productively engaged in learning while unsupervised by the teacher.

Small-group work is well organized, and students are productively engaged at all times, with students assuming responsibility for productivity.

Management
of transitions

 

Transitions are chaotic, with much time lost between activities or lesson segments.

Only some transitions are efficient, resulting in some loss of instructional time.

Transitions occur smoothly, with little loss of instructional time.

 

Transitions are seamless, with students assuming responsibility in ensuring their efficient operation.

Management of materials
and ­supplies

 

Materials and supplies are ­handled inefficiently, resulting in significant loss of instructional time.

 

Routines for handling materials and supplies function moderately well, but with some loss of instructional time.

 

Routines for handling materials and supplies occur smoothly, with little loss of instructional time.

 

Routines for handling materials and supplies are seamless, with students assuming some responsibility for smooth operation.

Performance of noninstructional duties

 

Considerable instructional time is lost in performing noninstructional duties.

 

Systems for performing noninstructional duties are only fairly efficient, resulting in some loss of instructional time.

Efficient systems for performing noninstructional duties are in place, resulting in minimal loss of instructional time.

Systems for performing noninstructional duties are well established, with students assuming considerable responsibility for efficient operation.

Supervision of volunteers and paraprofessionals

 

Volunteers and paraprofessionals have no clearly defined duties and are idle most of thetime.

 

Volunteers and paraprofessionals are productively engaged during portions of class time but require frequent supervision.

Volunteers and paraprofessionals are productively and independently engaged during the entire class.

 

Volunteers and paraprofessionals make a substantive contribution to the classroom environment.

 

 


 

Domain 2: The classroom environment

Component 2d: Managing Student Behavior

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Expectations

 

No standards of conduct appear to have been established, or students are confused as to what the standards are.

Standards of conduct appear to have been established, and most students seem to understand them.

 

Standards of conduct are clear to all students.

 

Standards of conduct are clear to all students and appear to have been developed with student participation.

 

Monitoring of
student behavior

 

Student behavior is not monitored, and teacher is unaware of what the students are doing.

 

Teacher is generally aware of student behavior but may miss the activities of some students.

 

Teacher is alert to student behavior at all times.

 

Monitoring by teacher is subtle and preventive. Students monitor their own and their peers’ behavior, correcting one another respectfully.

Response to student misbehavior

 

Teacher does not respond to misbehavior, or the response is inconsistent, is overly repressive, or does not respect the student’s dignity.

 

Teacher attempts to respond to student misbehavior but with uneven results, or there are no major infractions of the rules.

 

Teacher response to misbehavior is appropriate and successful and respects the student’s dignity, or student behavior is generally appropriate.

 

Teacher response to misbehavior is highly effective and sensitive to students’ individual needs, or student behavior is entirely appropriate.

 

 


 

Domain 2: The classroom environment

Component 2e: Organizing Physical Space

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Safety and accessibility

 

The classroom is unsafe, or learning is not accessible to some students.

 

The classroom is safe, and at least essential learning is accessible to most students.

 

The classroom is safe, and learning is equally accessible to all students.

 

The classroom is safe, and students themselves ensure that all learning is equally accessible to all students.

 

Arrangement of
furniture and use
of physical resources

 

The furniture arrangement hinders the learning activities, or the teacher makes poor use of physical resources.

 

Teacher uses physical resources adequately. The furniture may be adjusted for a lesson, but with limited effectiveness.

 

Teacher uses physical resources skillfully, and the furniture arrangement is a resource for
learning activities.

 

Both teacher and students use physical resources easily and skillfully, and students adjust the furniture to advance their learning.

 

 


 

Domain 3: Instruction

Component 3a: Communicating with Students

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Expectations for learning

 

Teacher’s purpose in a lesson or unit is unclear to students.

 

Teacher attempts to explain the instructional purpose, with limited success.

 

Teacher’s purpose for the lesson or unit is clear, including where it is situated within broader learning.

 

Teacher makes the purpose of the lesson or unit clear, including where it is situated within broader learning, linking that purpose to student interests.

Directions and procedures

 

Teacher’s directions and procedures are confusing to students.

 

Teacher’s directions and procedures are clarified after initial student confusion.

Teacher’s directions and procedures are clear to students.

 

Teacher’s directions and procedures are clear to students and anticipate possible student misunderstanding.

Explanations of content

 

Teacher’s explanation of the content is unclear or confusing or uses inappropriate language.

 

Teacher’s explanation of the content is uneven; some is done skillfully, but other portions are difficult to follow.

 

Teacher’s explanation of content is appropriate and connects with students’ knowledge and experience.

 

Teacher’s explanation of content is imaginative and connects with students’ knowledge and experience. Students contribute to explaining concepts to their peers.

Use of oral and written language

 

Teacher’s spoken language is inaudible, or written language is illegible. Spoken or written language contains errors of grammar or syntax. Vocabulary may be inappropriate, vague, or used incorrectly, leaving students confused.

Teacher’s spoken language is audible, and written language is legible. Both are used correctly and conform to standard English. Vocabulary is correct but limited or is not appropriate to the students’ ages or backgrounds.

 

Teacher’s spoken and written language is clear and correct and conforms to standard English. Vocabulary is appropriate to the students’ ages and interests.

 

Teacher’s spoken and written language is correct and conforms to standard English. It is also expressive, with well-chosen vocabulary that enriches the lesson. Teacher finds opportunities to extend students’ vocabularies.

 

 


 

Domain 3: Instruction

Component 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Quality of questions

 

Teacher’s questions are virtually all of poor quality, with low cognitive challenge and single correct responses, and they are asked in rapid succession.

Teacher’s questions are a combination of low and high quality, posed in rapid succession. Only some invite a thoughtful response.

 

Most of the teacher’s questions are of high quality. Adequate time is provided for students to respond.

 

Teacher’s questions are of uniformly high quality, with adequate time for students to respond. Students formulate many questions.

 

Discussion techniques

 

Interaction between teacher and students is predominantly recitation style, with the teacher mediating all questions and answers.

Teacher makes some attempt to engage students in genuine discussion rather than recitation, with uneven results.

Teacher creates a genuine discussion among students, stepping aside when appropriate.

 

Students assume considerable responsibility for the success of the discussion, initiating topics and making unsolicited contributions.

Student participation

 

A few students dominate the discussion.

 

Teacher attempts to engage all students in the discussion, but with only limited success.

Teacher successfully engages all students in the discussion.

 

Students themselves ensure that all voices are heard in the discussion.

 

 


 

Domain 3: Instruction

Component 3c: Engaging Students in Learning

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Activities and assignments

 

Activities and assignments are inappropriate for students’ age or background. Students are not mentally engaged in them.

 

Activities and assignments are appropriate to some students and engage them mentally, but others are not engaged.

 

Most activities and assignments are appropriate to students, and almost all students are cognitively engaged in exploring content.

 

All students are cognitively engaged in the activities and assignments in their exploration of content. Students initiate or adapt activities and projects to enhance their understanding.

Grouping of students

 

Instructional groups are inappropriate to the students or to the instructional outcomes.

 

Instructional groups are only partially appropriate to the students or only moderately successful in advancing the instructional outcomes of the lesson.

 

Instructional groups are productive and fully appropriate to the students or to the instructional purposes of the lesson.

 

Instructional groups are productive and fully appropriate to the students or to the instructional purposes of the lesson. Students take the initiative to influence the formation or adjustment of instructional groups.

Instructional materials and resources

 

Instructional materials and resources are unsuitable to the instructional purposes or do not engage students mentally.

 

Instructional materials and resources are only partially suitable to the instructional purposes, or students are only partially mentally engaged with them.

 

Instructional materials and resources are suitable to the instructional purposes and engage students mentally.

 

Instructional materials and resources are suitable to the instructional purposes and engage students mentally. Students initiate the choice, adaptation, or creation of materials to enhance their learning.

Structure and pacing

 

The lesson has no clearly defined structure, or the pace of the lesson is too slow or rushed, or both.

 

The lesson has a recognizable structure, although it is not uniformly maintained throughout the lesson. Pacing of the lesson is inconsistent.

The lesson has a clearly defined structure around which the activities are organized. Pacing of the lesson is generally appropriate.

The lesson’s structure is highly coherent, allowing for reflection and closure. Pacing of the lesson is appropriate for all students.

 


 

Domain 3: Instruction

Component 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Assessment criteria

 

Students are not aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated.

 

Students know some of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated.

 

Students are fully aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated.

 

Students are fully aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be evaluated and have contributed to the development of the criteria.

Monitoring of
student learning

 

Teacher does not monitor student learning in the curriculum.

 

Teacher monitors the progress of the class as a whole but elicits no diagnostic information.

 

Teacher monitors the progress of groups of students in the curriculum, making limited use of diagnostic prompts to elicit information.

 

Teacher actively and systematically elicits diagnostic information from individual students regarding their understanding and monitors the progress of individual students.

Feedback to students

 

Teacher’s feedback to students is of poor quality and not provided in a timely manner.

Teacher’s feedback to students is uneven, and its timeliness is inconsistent.

Teacher’s feedback to students is timely and of consistently high quality.

 

Teacher’s feedback to students is timely and of consistently high quality, and students make use of the feedback in their learning.

Student self-assessment and monitoring of progress

 

Students do not engage in self-assessment or monitoring of progress.

 

Students occasionally assess the quality of their own work against the assessment criteria and performance standards.

 

Students frequently assess and monitor the quality of their own work against the assessment criteria and performance standards.

 

Students not only frequently assess and monitor the quality of their own work against the assessment criteria and performance standards but also make active use of that information in their learning.

 


 

Domain 3: Instruction

Component 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Lesson adjustment

 

Teacher adheres rigidly to an instructional plan, even when a change is clearly needed.

 

Teacher attempts to adjust a lesson when needed, with only partially successful results.

Teacher makes a minor adjustment to a lesson, and the adjustment occurs smoothly.

 

Teacher successfully makes a major adjustment to a lesson when needed.

 

Response to students

 

Teacher ignores or brushes aside students’ questions or interests.

 

Teacher attempts to accommodate students’ questions or interests, although the pacing of the lesson is disrupted.

Teacher successfully accommodates students’ questions or interests.

 

Teacher seizes a major opportunity to enhance learning, building on student interests or a spontaneous event.

 

Persistence

 

When a student has difficulty learning, the teacher either gives up or blames the student or the student’s home environment.

 

Teacher accepts responsibility for the success of all students but has only a limited repertoire of instructional strategies to draw on.

 

Teacher persists in seeking approaches for students who have difficulty learning, drawing on a broad repertoire of strategies.

 

Teacher persists in seeking effective approaches for students who need help, using an extensive repertoire of strategies and soliciting additional resources from the school.

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4a: Reflecting on Teaching

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Accuracy

 

Teacher does not know whether a lesson was effective or achieved its instructional outcomes, or teacher profoundly misjudges the success of a lesson.

 

Teacher has a generally accurate impression of a lesson’s effectiveness and the extent to which instructional outcomes were met.

 

Teacher makes an accurate assessment of a lesson’s effectiveness and the extent to which it achieved its instructional outcomes and can cite general references to support the judgment.

 

Teacher makes a thoughtful and accurate assessment of a lesson’s effectiveness and the extent to which it achieved its instructional outcomes, citing many specific examples from the lesson and weighing the relative strengths of each.

Use in future teaching

 

Teacher has no suggestions for how a lesson could be improved another time the lesson is taught.

 

Teacher makes general suggestions about how a lesson could be improved another time the lesson is taught.

 

Teacher makes a few specific suggestions of what could be tried another time the lesson is taught.

 

Drawing on an extensive repertoire of skills, teacher offers specific alternative actions, complete with the probable success of different courses of action.

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4b: Maintaining Accurate Records

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Student completion of assignments

 

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is in disarray.

 

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is rudimentary and only partially effective.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is fully effective.

 

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student completion of assignments is fully effective. Students participate in maintaining the records.

Student progress
in learning

 

Teacher has no system for maintaining information on student progress in learning, or the system is in disarray.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student progress in learning is rudimentary and only partially effective.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student progress in learning is fully effective.

 

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on student progress in learning is fully effective. Students contribute information and participate in interpreting the records.

Noninstructional records

 

Teacher’s records for non­instructional activities are in disarray, resulting in errors andconfusion.

 

Teacher’s records for non-instructional activities are adequate, but they require frequent monitoring to avoid errors.

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on noninstructional activities is fully effective.

 

Teacher’s system for maintaining information on noninstructional activities is highly effective, and students contribute to its maintenance.

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4c: Communicating with Families

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Information about the instructional program

 

Teacher provides little or no information about the instructional program to families.

 

Teacher participates in the school’s activities for family communication but offers little additional information.

 

Teacher provides frequent information to families, as appropriate, about the instructional program.

 

Teacher provides frequent information to families, as appropriate, about the instructional program. Students participate in preparing materials for their families.

Information about individual students

 

Teacher provides minimal information to families about individual students, or the communication is inappropriateto the cultures of the families. Teacher does not respond, or responds insensitively, to family concerns about students.

Teacher adheres to the school’s required procedures for communicating with families. Responses to family concerns are minimal or may reflect occasional insensitivity to cultural norms.

 

Teacher communicates with families about students’ progress on a regular basis, respecting cultural norms, and is available as needed to respond to family concerns.

 

Teacher provides information to families frequently on student progress, with students contributing to the design of the system. Response to family concerns is handled with great professional and cultural sensitivity.

Engagement of families in the instructional program

 

Teacher makes no attempt to engage families in the instructional program, or such efforts are inappropriate.

 

Teacher makes modest and partially successful attempts to engage families in the instructional program.

 

Teacher’s efforts to engage families in the instructional program are frequent and successful.

 

Teacher’s efforts to engage families in the instructional program are frequent and successful. Students contribute ideas for projects that could beenhanced by family participation.

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4d: Participating in a Professional Community

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Relationships with colleagues

 

Teacher’s relationships with colleagues are negative or
self-serving.

 

Teacher maintains cordial relationships with colleagues to fulfill duties that the school or district requires.

 

Relationships with colleagues are characterized by mutual support and cooperation.

 

Relationships with colleagues are characterized by mutual support and cooperation. Teacher takes initiative
in assuming leadership among
the faculty.

Involvement in a culture of
professional inquiry

 

Teacher avoids participation in a culture of inquiry, resisting opportunities to become involved.

Teacher becomes involved in the school’s culture of inquiry when invited to do so.

 

Teacher actively participates in a culture of professional inquiry.

 

Teacher takes a leadership role in promoting a culture of professional inquiry.

 

Service to the school

 

Teacher avoids becoming involved in school events.

 

Teacher participates in school events when specifically asked.

 

Teacher volunteers to participate in school events, making a substantial contribution.

 

Teacher volunteers to participate in school events, making a substantial contribution, and assumes a leadership role in at least one aspect of school life.

Participation in school and district projects

 

Teacher avoids becoming involved in school and district projects.

 

Teacher participates in school and district projects when specifically asked.

 

Teacher volunteers to participate in school and district projects, making a substantial contribution.

 

Teacher volunteers to participate in school and district projects, making a substantial contribution, and assumes a leadership role in a major school or district project.

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4e: Growing and Developing Professionally

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Enhancement of content knowledge and pedagogical skill

 

Teacher engages in no professional development activities to enhance knowledge or skill.

 

Teacher participates in professional activities to a limited extent when they are convenient.

 

Teacher seeks out opportunities for professional development to enhance content knowledge and pedagogical skill.

Teacher seeks out opportunities for professional development and makes a systematic effort to conduct action research.

Receptivity to feedback
from colleagues

 

Teacher resists feedback on teaching performance from either supervisors or more experienced colleagues.

 

Teacher accepts, with some reluctance, feedback on teaching performance from both supervisors and professional colleagues.

Teacher welcomes feedback from colleagues when made by supervisors or when opportunities arise through professional collaboration.

Teacher seeks out feedback on teaching from both supervisors and colleagues.

 

Service to the profession

 

Teacher makes no effort to share knowledge with others or to assume professional responsibilities.

Teacher finds limited ways to contribute to the profession.

 

Teacher participates actively in assisting other educators.

 

Teacher initiates important activities to contribute to the profession.

 

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4f: Showing Professionalism

 

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

Developing

Effective

Highly Effective

Integrity and ethical conduct

 

Teacher displays dishonesty in interactions with colleagues, students, and the public.

 

Teacher is honest in interactions with colleagues, students, and the public.

 

Teacher displays high standards of honesty, integrity, and confidentiality in interactions with colleagues, students, and the public.

Teacher can be counted on to hold the highest standards of honesty, integrity, and confidentiality and takes a leadership role with colleagues.

Service to students

 

Teacher is not alert to students’ needs.

 

Teacher’s attempts to serve students are inconsistent.

 

Teacher is active in serving students.

 

Teacher is highly proactive in serving students, seeking out resources when needed.

Advocacy

 

Teacher contributes to school practices that result in some students being ill served by the school.

 

Teacher does not knowingly contribute to some students being ill served by the school.

 

Teacher works to ensure that all students receive a fair opportunity to succeed.

 

Teacher makes a concerted effort to challenge negative attitudes or practices to ensure that all students, particularly those traditionally underserved, are honored in the school.

 


 

Domain 4: professional responsibilities

Component 4f: Showing Professionalism (continued)

Elements: Integrity and ethical conduct Service to students Advocacy Decision making Compliance with school and district regulations

 

Element

Level of Performance

Ineffective

 

Developing

 

Effective

 

Highly Effective

 

Decision making

 

Teacher makes decisions and recommendations based on self-serving interests.

 

Teacher’s decisions and recommendations are based on limited though genuinely professional considerations.

 

Teacher maintains an open mind and participates in team or departmental decision making.

 

Teacher takes a leadership role in team or departmental decision making and helps ensure that such decisions are based on the highest professional standards.

Compliance with school and district regulations

 

Teacher does not comply with school and district regulations.

 

Teacher complies minimally with school and district regulations, doing just enough to get by.

Teacher complies fully with school and district regulations.

Teacher complies fully with school and district regulations, taking a leadership role with colleagues.

Danielson Component Headings

1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content & Pedagogy

1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students

1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes

1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources

1e: Designing Coherent Instruction


2a:  Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
2b:  Establishing a Culture for Learning
2c:  Managing Classroom Procedures
2d:  Managing Student Behavior
2e: Organizing Physical Space

3a:  Communicating with Students
3b:  Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
3c:  Engaging Students in Learning
3d:  Using Assessment in Instruction
3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness 

 

4a: Reflecting on Teaching

4b: Maintaining Accurate Records

4c: Communicating with Families

4d: Participating in a Professional Community

4e: Growing and Developing Professionally

4f: Showing Professionalism

 

  

SAMR model

SAMR